Post Tagged with: "media watch"

On wealth taxes as a talking point and Germany’s leading role in Europe

On wealth taxes as a talking point and Germany’s leading role in Europe

Here is the video of an interview I did with Max Keiser on the situation in Europe. A lot of our discussion revolves around why the Germans actually do want a cohesive Europe but feel compelled to pursue the present policy path. We also discuss the advancing plan bail-in plans in Europe and the advent of wealth taxes as a talking point in the crisis.

Read more ›
On Japan’s widowmaker trade and Reinhart and Rogoff

On Japan’s widowmaker trade and Reinhart and Rogoff

I was on the Daily Ticker with Lauren Lyster talking about Japan yesterday. My view is that there is no material negative change in Japan’s sovereign debt outlook nor will there be in the medium term because of Abenomics. The video is at the bottom of this post. Before you watch it let me say a little bit about why I take this view on Japan and speak more generally about government debt and deficits. Mike Konczal wrote a post that is getting a lot of buzz on high deficits and Reinhart and Rogoff that will be a good jumping off point for discussion.

Read more ›
QE will end this year after tapering off in June

QE will end this year after tapering off in June

I was on BNN’s Headline with Howard Green yesterday talking about the Fed’s QE program. I said that QE would be tapered and I believe it will likely end at the end of this year if the economy does not slip into recession. This is the timetable I felt was likely when I last spoke to BNN about QE a couple of months ago when commenting on Bill Gross’ view that QE would last through at least 2013.

Read more ›
Forecasting for the Post-Election Economy and a Post-Bernanke Federal Reserve

Forecasting for the Post-Election Economy and a Post-Bernanke Federal Reserve

Just a quick note here – I was on Capital Account last night talking about what I expect to happen politically next year. I spelled out some of it in my last post on the US election and the Fiscal Cliff. But here is a more complete view that includes not just the fiscal cliff but some thoughts on the […]

Read more ›
More on government tax coercion versus fiat money liberty

More on government tax coercion versus fiat money liberty

I was on RT’s Capital Account on Friday night talking to Lauren Lyster about QE and the conversation moved more into the realm of fiat currency and government’s coercive taxing power. This is particularly relevant given arguments within Republican circles about returning the US to the gold standard. Last July I wrote a post about fiat money called “Government tax […]

Read more ›
The Fed, the fiscal cliff and coming recession in 2013

The Fed, the fiscal cliff and coming recession in 2013

I wrote a piece in the New York Times that appeared yesterday along with Mark Thoma and John Cochrane. The question was “Should the Fed Risk Inflation to Spur Growth?” My answer was that the Fed should always keep an eye on inflation as that is its mandate. But, at present, outside of food and energy prices that the Fed […]

Read more ›
Germany is a first class passenger on the Euro Titanic

Germany is a first class passenger on the Euro Titanic

I was on RT’s Capital Account on Monday afternoon, talking about the euro crisis yet again. The video is below but I have a few comments before you watch it. In the video, I say Europe can continue dithering for quite a while. There is no sense in making predictions about imminent euro zone destruction because Europe has a lot […]

Read more ›
More on the Debt Crisis in Europe and the US

More on the Debt Crisis in Europe and the US

I was on the Alyona Show panel these past two Mondays talking to Alyona and Reason’s Anthony Randazzo about the debt crises in the US and Europe. As much as we tried to find something we could disagree on, we ended up agreeing a lot in both cases. As to the root causes of both crises, in the US, it’s largely about private debt. In the euro zone though, it’s really a balance of payments problem.

Read more ›
America’s slowdown is not about Europe, it’s about the debt

America’s slowdown is not about Europe, it’s about the debt

I would submit then that the problem is the debt. This is true right across the developed economies. Until the debt is reduced, global growth will be slow and that makes economies susceptible to recession. As much as the President wants to deflect attention toward the disaster building in Europe, he should admit to himself that more needs to be done on household debts, incomes and jobs. A banking-centric policy response has caught up with us and we’ll just have to see if we can ride this one out.

Read more ›
The Chinese water torture that is the euro zone debt crisis

The Chinese water torture that is the euro zone debt crisis

Here’s the video from last night’s capital Account with Lauren Lyster and Demetri Kofinas. Everyone keeps acting like this crisis is about to boil over and take the world economy with it. It certainly could. More likely though, we will continue to get these repeated cycles of crisis, bailout, and liquidity infusions.

Read more ›
On JPM’s Dimon’s still unassailable position and Facebook as the new Yahoo

On JPM’s Dimon’s still unassailable position and Facebook as the new Yahoo

I spoke to Paul Waldie and Brian Milner of the Globe & Mail on BNN’s headline on Monday. The big story was JPMorgan Chase and the London Whale trades. JPMorgan Chase’s CEO Jamie Dimon, as the leading lobbyists for the hands-off regulatory approach for US banks, has become a lightning rod for criticism of too big to fail banks in the US. Even so, I think it’s unlikely that Dimon will be forced out of his position. We also talked about Yahoo and the oversubscribed Facebook IPO. They are going to have to execute really, really well to justify the IPO valuation.

Read more ›
Fringe Politics in Europe

Fringe Politics in Europe

Nationalism is rising throughout Europe as we are expecting far-right parties to now enter parliaments in greece and france to add to the fringe parties in Finland, Austria and the Netherlands. In Germany, the Piratenpartei, another fringe party more geared to government transparency and without overt nationalist tendencies, is also poised for huge gains. These changes could make the politics of Europe unpredictable if the economy continues to suffer.

Read more ›