Category: Economy

What multiple should we give China’s GDP growth?

What multiple should we give China’s GDP growth?

By Michael Pettis Last week Derek Scissors, a think tank analysts at the American Enterprise Institute, published an articlein which he referred to an October, 2014, study by Credit Suisse that attempts to measure total household wealth by region and by country. Scissors argues that in the interminable debate about whether or not China will overtake the US as the […]

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Moral Hazard Taken Too Far

By Marc Chandler There is an element that links the terrible human tragedy in the Mediterranean and the ongoing Greek crisis.  It is Europe’s over-emphasis on moral hazard. Moral hazard is the idea that people will act irresponsibly if they do not have to bear the consequences.   No doubt, the concept offers valuable insight, up to a point.  The problem […]

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Greece: Irresistible Force Meets Immovable Object

By Marc Chandler Greece is expected to submit a more complete list of reforms in order to free up funds so the country can service its obligations.  Four times the Greek government has provided lists and four times the European group of finance minister rejected it. The IMF, which violated its own rules over the objections of its senior staff […]

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Is Greece’s Debt Odious?

There is a legal concept called “odious debts.” It can be traced back more than a century. The US helped create a precedent for it by denying Cuba’s responsibility for the debt incurred under Spanish colonial rule. The concept took on added significance in the post-colonial era more broadly. The issue here is the continuity of legal obligations from one regime to another especially as it pertains to the debt acquired.

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Albert Edwards on China

Albert Edwards on China

In the last post at Credit Writedowns Pro on the jobs number, I promised to talk about currency issues but I didn’t! Here are two issues then: the increasing current account surplus in Germany and the strong dollar’s effect on China. On Germany, it’s notable that merchandise trade as a share of GDP in Germany was 70.8% for the years […]

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Gauging the financial crisis end game

Gauging the financial crisis end game

It is quite possible that more than one end game will unfold in the months and years to come. For example, we could see a Greek Eurozone exit. Simultaneously, we could have a crisis unfolding across emerging markets, as the strong U.S. dollar begins to do damage to borrowers in those countries, of which there are many. Quite how it will all pan out is very difficult to predict. If I were a betting man, my money would be on the ‘permanent condition’ becoming the generally accepted view of the future economic environment.

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How might a China slowdown affect the world?

How might a China slowdown affect the world?

By Michael Pettis Two years ago it was hard to find analysts who expected average GDP growth over the rest of this decade to be less than 8%. The current consensus seems to have dropped to between 6% and 7% on average. I don’t think Beijing disagrees. After assuring us Tuesday that China’s economy – which is growing a little […]

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Consumption taxes, inflation and low wage growth in Japan lead to recession

Consumption taxes, inflation and low wage growth in Japan lead to recession

If wages in Japan are stagnant, how is increasing inflation going to help wage earners afford a better stream of good and services? It won’t. Ultimately, what we need to see are policies which maintain wages for median and lower-income wage earners with the greatest marginal propensity to spend. Without this, in a demographically challenged and indebted private sector, so-called secular stagnation is almost a certainty.

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Banks, Japanese trade, the currency wars and deflation

Banks, Japanese trade, the currency wars and deflation

There are no big themes dominating the news today. So it is a perfect time to hit a couple of themes with an economic and market theme approach. Let’s talk banks, Japanese trade, the currency wars and deflation.

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Abenomics 2.0 – Just What Are They Trying To Achieve?

Abenomics 2.0 – Just What Are They Trying To Achieve?

By Edward Hugh The recent move by the Bank of Japan to take further measures to accelerate the rate at which it ramps up its balance sheet took almost everyone – market watchers included – completely by surprise. The consequence was reasonably predictable – the yen has once more fallen strongly against almost all major currencies – and most notably […]

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Snail Trail Vortex

Snail Trail Vortex

The Absolute Return Letter, November 2014 “The single most robust and striking fact about cross-national growth is regression to the mean.”  -Lawrence Summers and Lant Pritchett Low growth is printed on the wall When financial markets capitulate, many investors lose the ability to keep things in perspective. That is a fact of life. Instead the little things take over and […]

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Home prices since 1870: No price like home

Home prices since 1870: No price like home

House price fluctuations take centre stage in recent macroeconomic debates, but little is known about their long-run evolution. This column presents new house price indices for 14 advanced economies since 1870. Real house prices display a pronounced hockey-stick pattern over the past 140 years. They stayed constant from the 19th to the mid-20th century, but rose strongly in the second half of the 20th century. Sharply increasing land prices, not construction costs, were the key driver of this trend.

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