Articles By: Edward Harrison

Edward Harrison is the founder of Credit Writedowns and a former career diplomat, investment banker and technology executive with over twenty years of business experience. He is also a regular economic and financial commentator on BBC World News, CNBC Television, Business News Network, CBC, Fox Television and RT Television. He speaks six languages and reads another five, skills he uses to provide a more global perspective. Edward holds an MBA in Finance from Columbia University and a BA in Economics from Dartmouth College. Edward also writes a premium financial newsletter. Sign up here for a free trial.

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Here are my most recent posts

Is the Fed panicked about the downshift in the US economy?

Is the Fed panicked about the downshift in the US economy?

The minutes from the Federal Reserve Board’s last meeting have come out and they are dovish. While on the one hand, we should praise the Fed for showing it is data-dependent just as it has professed to be, on the other hand, the abrupt change in is somewhat alarming. I would suggest the Fed is not necessarily panicked but it is certainly […]

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My thoughts on the US Q4 2015 GDP numbers

My thoughts on the US Q4 2015 GDP numbers

The US economy is not in a recession right now and the latest numbers on US GDP confirm this view. And while the headline growth number was weak, the consumer spending and personal income numbers are supportive of 2%ish growth into 2016. Some brief comments below U.S. GDP growth came in at a very weak 0.7% annualized pace for Q4 […]

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Is there a US Goldilocks scenario possible for 2016?

Is there a US Goldilocks scenario possible for 2016?

The jobs report today was a strong one, underscoring the ability of the US economy to power through. Am I uneasy about where we are in the economic and credit cycle and the accuracy of the Fed’s forward guidance? Yes – and I tend to think most of the risk is to the downside. Even so, there is a Goldilocks scenario […]

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The Saudis as the driving surplus oil producer

The Saudis as the driving surplus oil producer

As Brent crude hits 11-year lows, it’s worth thinking about why it is so low and what the likely outcomes will be. Warren Mosler has a view I think works regarding the Saudis as swing producer, targeting quantity instead of price and I want to run this concept by you to understand where this is headed. I believe oil is […]

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The Fed rate hike and the potential for US recession

The Fed rate hike and the potential for US recession

I am uneasy about where we are in the economic and credit cycle and the accuracy of the Fed’s forward guidance. I think we are above stall speed now. But I also think global policy divergence, slowing earnings growth and poor capex numbers could combine to bring on recession in 2016.

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When market contagion occurs, this is how it will happen

When market contagion occurs, this is how it will happen

Editor’s note: This post was originally published yesterday at Credit Writedowns Pro. I have been pretty sanguine about the markets and the US economy. Yes, the commodities complex is worsening, but that doesn’t mean this feeds through enough into other sectors to force the market down. And the real economy isn’t at stall speed yet either.We just aren’t there yet. Nevertheless, […]

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The mess in Portugal is negative for debt sustainability

The mess in Portugal is negative for debt sustainability

Portugal’s election on 4 October was inconclusive, without any party winning an absolute majority of the votes. The President of the country, a former Prime Minister, allowed his own party, led by incumbent Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho to form a new minority government as has been done in the past. However, the way he has gone about doing so has created a controversy, which has made Portugal the new focal point of the still virulent European sovereign debt crisis. While I don’t think this is a coup by any stretch, as some are saying, I do think Portugal has a tough road ahead regarding debt sustainability.

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Profit mean reversion and recession

Profit mean reversion and recession

Yesterday I retweeted an interesting tweet by Business Insider’s Henry Blodget which references an article on data compiled by Barclays on profit mean reversion and recession. The gist of the article is that a profits recession generally presages a real recession except perhaps to the degree the profit downturn is caused by the volatile oil sector. While I am not […]

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Credit Writedowns is ending paid subscriptions for now

For nearly four years now, Credit Writedowns has been run using a freemium model, with most of the content behind a firewall. But over the past two years, the amount of time I have been able to devote to the blog and newsletter has declined. This week, I have been unable to write an in-depth note on the economy and markets. And for some time now, I have not been able to keep up a regular schedule of posts. As a result, I have decided to end all paid subscriptions and make the Credit Writedowns Pro newsletter free.

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The Greece debt bailout negotiations are really about France, not Greece

The Greece debt bailout negotiations are really about France, not Greece

This post was originally written for Credit Writedowns Pro on 12 Jun before Greece defaulted on loans to the IMF. The situation in Greece is not about Greece at all. It is about enforcing an economic framework onto all Eurozone countries. And because the policy goal is primarily about enforcing this economic framework everywhere in the eurozone, there is less policy space available […]

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Did lending by foreign banks really cause the Greek debt crisis?

Did lending by foreign banks really cause the Greek debt crisis?

There are a lot of competing narratives going around as to why Greece is in such trouble relative to the rest of the eurozone. A lot of this centers on whether Greek fiscal profligacy or poor credit controls by foreign banks was the main cause of the Greek debt crisis. Let me throw my hat into this ring with a few comments. What I say below will generally shade toward the problem being one of fiscal profligacy worsened by an ECB monetary policy that was inappropriate for the eurozone periphery as a whole and Greece in particular.

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More on Greek Tax Anticipation Note IOUs

More on Greek Tax Anticipation Note IOUs

The rumour making the rounds today is that these two paragraphs in a recent Ambrose Evans-Pritchard piece in the Telegraph are what were the final straw for Syriza that cost Yanis Varoufakis his job. I don’t know whether there is any basis to these rumours. However, I do know that Syriza want Greece to remain in the eurozone and that recent decisions by the ECB make it difficult for Greece. So the questions of government IOUs have to asked.

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