Tag: Willem Buiter

The German view of the Euro crisis

This is an abbreviated version of a post first published at Credit Writedowns Pro on 15 Oct. The Germans got into the eurozone out of a desire to increase European integration and to strengthen Europe as an economic area that rivalled the United States. Yet, now we are in a period where the Germans are being blamed for everything that’s […]

On Fed tapering, policy co-ordination and emerging market risk

On Fed tapering, policy co-ordination and emerging market risk

I am concerned about what is happening in the emerging markets but not alarmed. Fed tapering was a proximate trigger but not a cause. All indications are that the crisis is hitting only the most exposed and vulnerable markets and that this doesn’t have to boomerang onto other markets. The worry has to be that contagion causes the locus of stress to spread to economic agents that should be less vulnerable, causing the crisis to metastisize and spiral out of control. Policy co-ordination in foreign exchange will be key if this occurs.

Why fiscal sustainability matters

Why fiscal sustainability matters

By Willem Buiter This post first appeared on Vox Fiscal sustainability has become a hot topic as a result of the European sovereign debt crisis, but it matters in normal times, too. This column argues that financial sector reforms are essential to ensure fiscal sustainability in the future. Although emerging market reforms undertaken in the aftermath of the financial crises […]

Buiter: Most European banks are zombies

Buiter: Most European banks are zombies

It’s Easter weekend here in Germany and I caught this interview with Willem Buiter from the Financiëele Dagblad that I get by e-mail each morning. I thought it was significant enough that I would translate it. Buiter has been fairly pessimistic about the future integrity of the euro zone and thinks that some of the euro members are destined to leave the euro area.

Europe is on the brink of something very big

Europe is on the brink of something very big

Euro zone bond markets have come completely unhinged this morning. Spanish 10-year yields have hit the highest level this year at 6.5%. While Italian 10-year yields broke above 6% for the first time since late January. Meanwhile, German yields have moved to a record low of 1.44%. We are now back to levels of stress we last saw during the Italian crisis in November and December. However, this time policy space has narrowed considerably. In short, Europe has reached the critical breaking point.

On helicopter drops and wealth confiscation in Europe

On helicopter drops and wealth confiscation in Europe

Hugh Hendry made some remarks about confiscation last week that I addressed in my TV appearance on RT’s capital account (see video here). The gist of his comments was that he fears government’s ability to confiscate wealth as a means of dealing with the economic crisis in Europe. On RT, I said that I didn’t think the situation had reached that point in Europe and so I was not overly concerned. But I do want to flag comments by a major bank economist that touch on these issues.