Post Tagged with: "government bonds"

The disaster in Europe versus data in the US (plus China and Argentina)

The disaster in Europe versus data in the US (plus China and Argentina)

Despite the title, this is not a mono-themed post but more of a highlight of recent news and data and their importance in interpreting the direction of the economy and potential effect on markets. I do want to concentrate on European and US data but I also have some data points from elsewhere. Let’s start with Europe. Europe needs a […]

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Cyclical recovery petering out before it hits middle class

Cyclical recovery petering out before it hits middle class

Before I get into the details today, I want to note that going forward, I may not have the bandwidth to be able to post on a daily basis. I am going to try. But there are definitely going to be weekdays going forward where I won’t be able to post given other commitments I am making. I don’t want […]

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Edward Harrison’s Ten Surprises for 2014, Update 2

Edward Harrison’s Ten Surprises for 2014, Update 2

Today is the time to update you on how my 2014 surprises are faring and why. Just to remind you, the surprise list is based on Byron Wien’s list of ten surprises which he has been conducting for the last thirty years. Surprises are events to which investors assign 1-in-3 odds of happening but which I believe have a more […]

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The Italian Runaway Train

The Italian Runaway Train

By Edward Hugh There has been lot’s of debate in the press and in academic circles over the last week or so about whether Italy’s latest contraction constitutes a triple dip recession or simply a continuation of what’s been going on over many many years. This is an interesting theoretical nicety, but in fact what is happening in Italy at […]

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Economic and market themes: 2014-08-01 US, China, Argentina, France

Economic and market themes: 2014-08-01 US, China, Argentina, France

This week’s economic and market themes piece is going to be a little shorter than usual because I have covered a lot of the major topics earlier in the week. [Content protected for Gold members only] My take here is that France and Italy are the countries to watch in Europe. Watch Italy because it is in a precarious position, […]

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Why the European sovereign debt crisis is not over

Why the European sovereign debt crisis is not over

Earlier today, I had an interesting back and forth on Twitter with Edward Hugh, Claus Vistesen and Matthew Lynn about Europe and the ECB. I think we all believe there is more pain to come for Europe and likely there will be writedowns. But I think a lot of the problem has to do with the flawed institutional architecture and […]

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The euro crisis: Muddling through, or on the way to a more perfect euro union?

The euro crisis: Muddling through, or on the way to a more perfect euro union?

After a promising first decade, the Eurozone faced a severe crisis. This column looks at the Eurozone’s short history through the lens of an evolutionary approach to forming new institutions. German dominance has allowed the euro to achieve a number of design objectives, and this may continue if Germany does not shirk its responsibilities. Germany’s resilience and dominant size within the EU may explain its ‘muddling through’ approach to the Eurozone crisis. Greater mobility of labour and lower mobility of under-regulated capital may be the costly ‘second best’ adjustment until the arrival of more mature Eurozone institutions.

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On reaching for yield and ECB QE

On reaching for yield and ECB QE

I believe investors are reaching for yield and there are multiple signals indicating such. This is a direct outgrowth of easy money policies by central banks as  nominal yields are at record lows and real yields are negative. Investors, particularly pension funds, are having a hard time adjusting to the new monetary regime of financial repression and low nominal returns. […]

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Europe on the mend and China decelerating

Europe on the mend and China decelerating

The Euro area composite PMI rose to 54.0 from 53.1, making it unlikely that the ECB will move against deflation in May The Chinese HSBC/Markit flash manufacturing PMI was up to 48.3 from 48.0. However, this still shows contracting manufacturing and means China is still rebalancing Yesterday on Boom Bust, the finance show I produce, Marshall Auerback gave a good […]

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Dealing with confirmation bias in macro analysis at market turning points

Dealing with confirmation bias in macro analysis at market turning points

My macro view for most of the global economy is upbeat. My only downbeat views concern deceleration of growth in emerging markets and froth in capital markets. But in the main, market and economic momentum is up and to the right. The natural path is progress. Or at least it has been for the last couple hundred years. In that vein, I see the US in a middling upturn, Europe in an improving recovery and China in a softish landing due to loss socialization. But if you read my daily analysis, it is full of worry and in-depth coverage of downside risks. For some of you, it can be confusing. You’re saying to yourself, “I thought you were upbeat about this.”

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Risk for Greece and European periphery from Ukraine crisis escalation mounts

Risk for Greece and European periphery from Ukraine crisis escalation mounts

The big news in the markets today is the standoff in eastern Ukraine between pro-Russian armed rebels and the Ukrainian military. This has European markets selling off. The potential for problems in eastern Ukraine is something we should have seen as a possibility given the motives in the Texas annexation I outlined as a comparative case. Given that analysis, I still believe the question now is more about how Ukraine responds in eastern Ukraine than how Russia, Europe, NATO, or the US respond. It looks like we will get a military response. And as such, the potential for dramatically increasing tension with Russia is high. The European periphery will be especially vulnerable because of this. In addition, Russia is already moving away from the West as a hedge. Thoughts below

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Economic and market themes: 2014-04-11 – Greece

Economic and market themes: 2014-04-11 – Greece

This week’s theme post will be exclusively about Greece because I think the Greek bond deal is emblematic of trends we see in markets and the real economy. And of course, the big news in the past few days is Greece. Its 5-year government bond deal was over six times oversubscribed, even after a 50% increase in the allotment. The […]

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